practice sales and use tax

Sales and Use Tax for Practice Owners

Over the past few years we have seen an increased focus by the North Carolina Department of Revenue (NCDOR) on dentists for the audit of sales and use tax compliance. With this in mind, we want to work with our Practice owners to educate and proactively prevent the massive impact these audits can cause.

Sales tax is what we all expect to pay when we purchase items in our day-to-day lives. As a Practice owner, it is necessary to charge sales tax on certain items like electric toothbrushes. As a general rule of thumb, we tell our dental clients: If it leaves in the patient’s mouth, the items and services are NOT subject to sales tax. With this being said, everything else that does not leave in the patient’s mouth may be subject to the tax. If you are unclear which items this applies to, our team will work with you to review your product offerings and determine which items sales tax should be added to.

When looking at use tax, this is what applies when you purchase items from a vendor and they do not charge you tax. If you receive invoices for supplies and equipment or office supplies, your Practice is responsible for reporting this information. In addition, you must pay the sales tax the vendor did not charge. For example, this could be when Practice owners purchase items from out of state suppliers, online vendors, or small retailers.

While it can be time consuming and difficult, compliance with both parts of the tax is necessary. For this reason, one of our main goals is to implement procedures to ease the compliance process for our clients.

Best Practices

Each month you should total the number of items sold by your Practice that were subject to sales tax and forward to your accountant. Remember, review your Practice Management software reports as this information may already be shown.

For use tax, we recommend you include your office manager or a trusted member of staff in this process. This staff member must review all invoices from your vendors to verify if sales tax was charged. If not, those invoices should be set aside for payment of Use Tax. This information needs to be shared with your accountant on a regular basis.

To learn more about how we can support your Practice in this process, contact us!

IRS Business Owners

Interacting with the IRS: New Business Owners

Did you start or acquire a new business this year? If so, you may feel a little overwhelmed with the new responsibilities and you could be a little intimidated interacting with the IRS for the first time. The first thing you should do as a new business owner is get a tax ID number or Employer Identification Number (EIN). You can apply for this directly through the IRS online.

Your Tax Responsibilities:
  • File your business’s annual income tax return
  • Pay estimated taxes for you if you own a pass-through entity or for your C Corporation
  • Payroll Tax Activities: withholding, depositing payments, and filing employer tax returns
  • Submit information returns if you have independent contractors, maintain qualified retirement plans, or offer other benefit programs to your staff

You can and sometimes must handle certain tax responsibilities electronically. Many online activities can be facilitated utilizing government provided resources listed below. Not everything listed below may apply to you so remember to consult your accountant if you have any questions.

Depositing Taxes
  • If you have a payroll or make estimated tax payments, schedule your tax deposits in advance by using EFTPS.gov.
  • Transmit W-2s to the Social Security Administration
  • Submit copies of employees’ W-2s with an IRS transmittal form (Form W-3) to the Social Security Administration through the Business Services Online. This suite of services allows organizations, businesses, individuals, employers, attorneys, non-attorneys representing Social Security claimants, and third-parties to exchange information with Social Security securely over the internet. You must register and create your own password to access Business Services Online.
  • Remit Information Returns to the IRS
  • You may have to file annual information returns to inform the IRS about your payments to independent contractors you utilize. Complete this task through the Filing Independent Returns Electronically (FIRE) System
Filing Annual Retirement Plan Returns

If you want or need to file a form in the 5500 series electronically, do this through the Department of Labor’s EFAST2. This is an all-electronic system designed by the Department of Labor, Internal Revenue Service, and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. The purpose is to simplify and expedite the submission, receipt, and processing of the Form 5500 and Form 5500-SF. These forms must be electronically filed each year by employee benefit plans to satisfy annual reporting requirements under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and the Internal Revenue Code.

If you need assistance with any of the required tasks above, our professionals can help. Click here to contact us today!